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Profane Culture$
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Paul E. Willis

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691163697

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691163697.001.0001

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The Golden Age

The Golden Age

Chapter:
(p.82) 4 The Golden Age
Source:
Profane Culture
Author(s):

Paul E. Willis

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691163697.003.0004

This chapter explores the musical tastes of the motor-bike boys. Pop music was a manifest and ever-present part of the environment of the motor-bike boys: it pervaded their whole culture. However, the motor-bike boys had very specific tastes that were not part of the current pop music scene, and were not catered for in the on-going mass-media sources. They liked the music of the early rock 'n' roll period between 1955 and 1960, especially that of Buddy Holly and Elvis Presley. By current standards in the commercial market and the pop music provided by mass-media channels, their tastes were at least ten years out of date. By deliberate choice, then, and not by the accident of a passive reception, they chose this music. This reveals the dialectical capacity which early rock 'n' roll had to reflect, resonate, and return something of real value to the motor-bike boys.

Keywords:   motor-bike boys, bike culture, pop music, rock 'n' roll, time

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