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1989The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe$
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Mary Elise Sarotte

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691163710

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691163710.001.0001

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Securing Building Permits

Securing Building Permits

Chapter:
(p.150) Chapter 5 Securing Building Permits
Source:
1989
Author(s):

Mary Elise Sarotte

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691163710.003.0006

This chapter details how Helmut Kohl still had to secure building permits to start work even after the prefab model emerged as the winner among the models. Kohl particularly had to convince Gorbachev because he needed some form of permission from not only Moscow but also Warsaw to proceed with his plans for East Germany. Close cooperation between Kohl and the Bush administration ensued—which involved the chancellor and his aides making repeated trips to the States in spring and summer 1990, often just weeks apart—with the mission of finding ways to convince their NATO allies to make reform a reality in time to sway Gorbachev. In the second half of 1990, Kohl got the building permits that he needed to move the prefabricated structures that had served West Germany well—its alliance, constitution, currency, and market economy—eastward to replace the ruins of Eastern socialism.

Keywords:   Helmut Kohl, building permits, prefab model, Gorbachev, East Germany, Bush administration, NATO, socialism

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