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Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern EuropeFrom Machiavelli to Milton$
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Hilary Gatti

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691163833

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691163833.001.0001

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Liberty and Religion

Liberty and Religion

Chapter:
(p.31) Chapter 2 Liberty and Religion
Source:
Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern Europe
Author(s):

Hilary Gatti

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691163833.003.0003

This chapter addresses the question of liberty in sixteenth-century religious debates. It first takes a look at the discussion between the Augustinian friar Martin Luther and Dutch humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam concerning the freedom of the will. The chapter then turns to the theological thinking of John Calvin and the reintroduction into the Protestant world of the notion of heresy. Hereafter the chapter details the circumstances surrounding the dramatic rupture between the friar Giordano Bruno and the Dominican order, including the philosophical doctrines which eventually landed him in the Inquisition. Finally, this chapter follows up on Bruno's insights through the commentary of theologians Richard Hooker and Jacob Harmensz, who is more widely known as Jacobus Arminius.

Keywords:   religion, Christianity, Catholicism, Protestantism, Martin Luther, Erasmus of Rotterdam, John Calvin, Giordano Bruno, Richard Hooker, Jacobus Arminius

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