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Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern EuropeFrom Machiavelli to Milton$
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Hilary Gatti

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691163833

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691163833.001.0001

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The Freedom of the Press

The Freedom of the Press

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter 4 The Freedom of the Press
Source:
Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern Europe
Author(s):

Hilary Gatti

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691163833.003.0005

This chapter first turns to the problem of writing histories, beginning with a major figure in the Catholic culture of France, Jacques Auguste de Thou, whose way of writing history brought him into conflict with his own church in terms that presaged future events such as the story of Paolo Sarpi or the ordeal of Galileo. It then turns to the poet and polemicist John Milton, a controversial figure who was closely identified with the English parliamentary struggles and civil war. The chapter reviews his works, particularly his Areopagitica: A Speech of Mr. John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicens'd Printing (1644), a pamphlet written in favor of the freedom of the press. It draws attention to one of the major themes of his Areaopagitica: his treatment throughout the work of the problem of schisms and sects.

Keywords:   freedom, press, history writing, John Milton, Areaopagitica, schisms, sects

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