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The Good ImmigrantsHow the Yellow Peril Became the Model Minority$
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Madeline Y. Hsu

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691164021

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691164021.001.0001

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“Economic and Humanitarian”

“Economic and Humanitarian”

Propaganda and the Redemption of Chinese Immigrants through Refugee Relief

Chapter:
(p.166) Chapter 7 “Economic and Humanitarian”
Source:
The Good Immigrants
Author(s):

Madeline Y. Hsu

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691164021.003.0007

This chapter discusses how the mandate for refugee relief and widespread publicity that magnified the merits of Chinese applied further pressures for U.S. immigration reform. Hong Kong's refugee crisis of 1962 provided opportunity to affirm the transformed image of Chinese with White House authorization of parole for over fifteen thousand with popular and congressional support. Committee hearings promoted the deserving traits of Chinese as refugees but also as immigrants, described culturally as highly employable and self-sufficient, politically conforming, and with family values that minimized social burdens on the public so that whether admitted on the basis of individual merit, family reunification, or refugee status, their likely success as Americans demanded more general immigration reform based on such criteria rather than race and national origin.

Keywords:   refugee relief, Chinese, U.S. immigration, Hong Kong, White House, social burdens, Americans, immigration reform

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