Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
In-Your-Face PoliticsThe Consequences of Uncivil Media$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Diana C. Mutz

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691165110

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691165110.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 July 2018

Does the Medium Matter?

Does the Medium Matter?

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter 7 Does the Medium Matter?
Source:
In-Your-Face Politics
Author(s):

Diana C. Mutz

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691165110.003.0007

This chapter begins by reviewing arguments evaluating whether television is unique as a medium of political communication. It analyzes whether any of these same effects occur in response to incivility in political discourse that reaches audiences through other media. Although in-your-face politics has been framed as a theory about the effects of television, incivility in political discourse can also occur on the radio, and at times even within newspapers. Furthermore, the Internet has become a particular locus of concern with respect to the civility of political discourse in recent years. Questioning whether in-your-face politics is tied to the emergence of television is important for purposes of understanding the potential historical importance of in-your-face politics.

Keywords:   political communication, television, radio, newspapers, Internet, incivility, audiences, political discourse

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.