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The Locust and the BeePredators and Creators in Capitalism's Future$
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Geoff Mulgan

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691165745

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691165745.001.0001

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Capitalism’s Critics

Capitalism’s Critics

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter 5 Capitalism’s Critics
Source:
The Locust and the Bee
Author(s):

Geoff Mulgan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691165745.003.0005

This chapter examines the consistent criticisms that have been made of capitalism over two centuries and that continue to be made. They have damned capitalism as a conspiracy of the powerful; as the mindless enemy of mindful reflection; as the destroyer of true value, whether in nature or culture; as the enemy of community and social bonds; and as being against life. This last point shows just how different capitalism is from the market. Where markets are full of life and social interaction, the places where capitalist power is most concentrated can be the opposite of life. Dull and soulless central business districts, automated factory production lines, or the grimly abstract headquarters of global banks embody an aesthetic that runs counter to the vibrant, variegated patterns of living things like forests or coral reefs.

Keywords:   capitalism, social bonds, community, market, social interaction, central business districts, global banks, capitalist power

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