Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dead RingersHow Outsourcing Is Changing the Way Indians Understand Themselves$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shehzad Nadeem

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691147871

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691147871.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

The Rules of the Game

The Rules of the Game

Chapter:
(p.102) Chapter Five. The Rules of the Game
Source:
Dead Ringers
Author(s):

Shehzad Nadeem

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691147871.003.0006

This chapter traces the offshoring of work from the United States to India as it occurred at one company. It considers the types of work being moved and the labor conditions under which they are performed. While the complexity of services offered from India is increasing, there are presently limits to how high subsidiaries and subcontractors will move up the so-called value ladder. That is, they depend on standardized work for the bulk of their revenues. This translates into extreme levels of work rationalization, or the Taylorization of information work, and consequently, high turnover. The chapter also emphazies two points: first, the Indian outsourcing industry is not terribly innovative; second, Indian workers are innocent of the knowledge of what to do and must be told. It argues that outsourcing workers do not take “ownership” of their work for a variety of reasons beyond an ingrained lack of initiative.

Keywords:   offshoring, United States, India, subsidiaries, subcontractors, work rationalization, information work, turnover, outsourcing industry, Indian workers

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.