Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Between Citizens and the StateThe Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher P. Loss

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691148274

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691148274.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Reorganizing Higher Education in the Shadow of the Great War

Reorganizing Higher Education in the Shadow of the Great War

Chapter:
(p.19) Chapter 2 Reorganizing Higher Education in the Shadow of the Great War
Source:
Between Citizens and the State
Author(s):

Christopher P. Loss

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691148274.003.0002

This chapter examines the growth of American higher education during the 1920s. Though World War I caused havoc at many campuses, some fields of study, such as psychology, exploited the war in order to extend their professional influence beyond the university laboratory. The explosion in psychological knowledge after World War I moreover opened up higher education's parental powers beyond the academic and bodily to include students' emotional health and well-being. This new focus on personal adjustment turned higher education into an institution that not only imparted knowledge and credentials to students, but also offered students training to navigate hierarchical organizations. Higher education pioneered work on personal adjustment, which during and after World War II became the very heart of educated citizenship.

Keywords:   1920s, World War I, psychology, emotional health, student well-being, personal adjustment, hierarchical organizations, educated citizenship

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.