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The Emergence of Organizations and Markets$
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John F. Padgett and Walter W. Powell

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691148670

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691148670.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

The Emergence of Corporate Merchant-Banks in Dugento Tuscany

The Emergence of Corporate Merchant-Banks in Dugento Tuscany

Chapter:
(p.121) 5 The Emergence of Corporate Merchant-Banks in Dugento Tuscany
Source:
The Emergence of Organizations and Markets
Author(s):

John F. Padgett

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691148670.003.0005

This chapter illustrates that the Tuscan merchant-banks organizationally sat at the intersection of the otherwise distinct relational-flow domains of international trade, state finance, and noble kinship. Instead of mobile merchants from many nations traveling with their wares to and from central markets in France, a network of Italian (mostly Tuscan) merchant-banks developed in the mid-1200s effecting international movements of both goods and currency through themselves. Such banks were constructed out of sedentary merchants arranged in geographically distributed filiali or branches, sending letters to each other. Their multifunctional network position, the chapter argues, is why organizational innovations cascaded from one domain to another.

Keywords:   Tuscan merchant-banks, corporate merchant-banks, Tuscany, international trade, state finance, noble kinship, organizational innovations

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