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On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy$
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G. A. Cohen and Michael Otsuka

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691148700

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691148700.001.0001

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Rescuing Justice from Constructivism and Equality from the Basic Structure Restriction

Rescuing Justice from Constructivism and Equality from the Basic Structure Restriction

Chapter:
(p.236) Chapter Twelve Rescuing Justice from Constructivism and Equality from the Basic Structure Restriction
Source:
On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy
Author(s):

G. A. Cohen

, Michael Otsuka
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691148700.003.0014

This chapter concatenates excerpts from Cohen's book Rescuing Justice and Equality. The first two parts correspond to the distinct rescues indicated by that book title. Part One pursues the rescue of justice from constructivism. It is about the identity of justice. Part Two pursues the rescue of equality from the basic structure restriction. It is about the scope of justice. The identity question is at issue in an argument presented against the Rawlsian identification of justice with the principles that constructivist selectors select. The scope question is at issue in an argument presented against the Rawlsian restriction of the application of principles of distributive justice to the basic structure of society. The two Rawlsian positions (on identity and on scope) here under criticism are mainly in a very brief Part Three, substantially independent of each other, and so, too, will be the arguments against them.

Keywords:   justice, constructivism, equality, John Rawls, G. A. Cohen, political philosophy

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