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Finding Oneself in the Other$
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G. A. Cohen

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691148809

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691148809.001.0001

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A Black and White Issue

A Black and White Issue

Chapter:
(p.20) Chapter Three A Black and White Issue
Source:
Finding Oneself in the Other
Author(s):

G. A. Cohen

, Michael Otsuka
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691148809.003.0003

This chapter discusses academic boycotts in the context of the 1985 ban of South Africa and Namibian participants from attending a World Archaeological Congress (WAC) gathering at Southampton. It argues that a policy of selective academic boycott expresses condemnation of the apartheid regime. For some people, however, the fact itself, together with the desirability of showing where we stand, of not condoning apartheid through silence, justifies a boycott policy. Here, the chapter emphasizes that the only responsible way to assess any policy towards South Africa is strategically: that is, with reference to the policy's probable impact on the struggle for liberation.

Keywords:   South Africa, Namibia, apartheid, academic boycotts, World Archaeological Congress, WAC, boycott policy, liberation

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