Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Of Empires and CitizensPro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Amaney A. Jamal

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691149646

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691149646.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Introduction
Source:
Of Empires and Citizens
Author(s):

Amaney A. Jamal

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691149646.003.0001

This chapter provides an overview of book's main themes. This book explores Kuwait and Jordan as two states that have similar clientelistic ties to the United States. Both are monarchies holding parliamentary elections, and each has similar levels of support for its Islamist opposition movements. However, the two states vary in their levels of anti-American sentiment among these Islamist opposition forces. This core difference reveals how concerns about a country's international relations shape state–society relations more broadly. Although the book builds its argument by focusing on the cases of Kuwait and Jordan, it also draws on evidence from two other monarchies that have varying degrees of anti-American sentiment among their Islamist opposition as well: Morocco and Saudi Arabia. Further, it extends the findings to Palestine's democratic experience, which resulted in Hamas' parliamentary victory in 2006.

Keywords:   Kuwait, Jordan, United States, international relations, anti-American sentiment, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Palestine, state–society relations, clientelism

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.