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Of Empires and CitizensPro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?$
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Amaney A. Jamal

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691149646

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691149646.001.0001

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Morocco

Morocco

Support for the Status Quo

Chapter:
(p.174) Chapter Six Morocco
Source:
Of Empires and Citizens
Author(s):

Amaney A. Jamal

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691149646.003.0006

This chapter focuses on Morocco, highlighting how citizens across the North African monarchy rationalize authoritarianism through the prism of strategic utility to U.S. (and EU) ties. Morocco includes one of the most progressive Islamic movements in the region, and citizens, while applauding the movement's moderation, remain wary of its foreign intentions. Enhancing ties with the United States and maintaining ties to Europe were often cited as key reasons why the status quo was preferable to increasing levels of democracy. It became apparent that although the Islamic Party for Justice and Development is considered moderate in terms of its internal Islamic agenda, many in the kingdom worried about the party's stance toward the United States.

Keywords:   Morocco, clientelism, anti-Americanism, Islamic movements, authoritarianism, democracy, United States, Islamic Party for Justice and Development

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