Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Alzheimer ConundrumEntanglements of Dementia and Aging$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Margaret Lock

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691149783

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691149783.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 31 May 2020

Genome-Wide Association Studies: Back to the Future

Genome-Wide Association Studies: Back to the Future

Chapter:
(p.156) Chapter 6 Genome-Wide Association Studies: Back to the Future
Source:
The Alzheimer Conundrum
Author(s):

Margaret Lock

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691149783.003.0007

This chapter examines findings from the newly developed technology of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) being applied to the investigation of Alzheimer disease (AD), primarily in the United States, United Kingdom, and France. These linked research projects make use of many thousands of DNA samples procured from individuals diagnosed with AD, which are then assessed using high-speed throughput technology and compared with control samples, in an attempt to find out what combinations of genes put individuals at increased risk. To date, these enormously expensive projects have provided few if any startling new insights, and many researchers are highly skeptical as to their value. However, others believe that GWAS is a first step toward a more sophisticated way of understanding the interrelated pathways of the numerous genes that appear to be implicated in AD.

Keywords:   GWAS, genome-wide association studies, Alzheimer disease, DNA samples, control samples, genes, throughput technology

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.