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Competition in the Promised LandBlack Migrants in Northern Cities and Labor Markets$
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Leah Platt Boustan

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691150871

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691150871.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Competition in the Promised Land
Author(s):

Leah Platt Boustan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691150871.003.0001

This introductory chapter outlines the central themes and methodologies underpinning this book. It discusses the factors for slow black economic progress in the North following the Great Black Migration. Despite the promise of the North and despite optimistic predictions, black migration to industrial cities did not lead to economic parity with whites either for the migrants themselves or for their children during the mid-twentieth century. This chapter introduces a new element to the story by pointing out that that the persistent influx of black migrants to northern labor and housing markets had created competition for existing black residents in an economic setting already constrained by weakening labor demand and northern racism.

Keywords:   black economy, Great Black Migration, industrial cities, black migrants, northern labor, northern housing markets, black residents

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