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The Enneads of PlotinusA Commentary$

Paul Kalligas

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691154213

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691154213.001.0001

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Source:
The Enneads of Plotinus
Author(s):

Paul Kalligas

, Elizabeth Key Fowden, Nicolas Pilavachi
Publisher:
Princeton University Press

(p.679)

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Figure 1. Bust of a philosopher, ca. 260 CE. Portrait of Plotinus(?). Museum of Ostia, cat. no. 68.

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Figure 2. Sarcophagus depicting a philosopher teaching, ca. 270 CE. Designated by Rodenwaldt 1936, 104–5, as the “Sarcophagus of Plotinus.” Gregorian Museum, Vatican.

© Photo Vatican Museums.

(p.680)

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Figure 3. Bust of a philosopher, ca. 300 CE. Portrait of Porphyry(?). Athens Archaeological Museum, cat. no. 581.

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Figure 4. “Prometheus Sarcophagus” from Arles, ca. 240 CE. Louvre Museum, cat. no. MA 339/95DE3916. Described by Cumont 1942a, 318–24, as depicting the soul’s sojourn on earth. Prometheus is shown on the left molding human bodies under the guidance of Athena, a solar deity, and the astrological horoscopos. Next comes Hermes conducting the soul. The embodied soul is then seen proceeding under the supervision of the three rulers of Fate, the Moirai, and their enthroned mother, Adrasteia, under the watchful eye of the sea-god Poseidon. On the far right, the soul is escorted away from the clasp of Earth toward an otherworldly region of unperturbed bliss. Cf. Festugière 1957, 195–202.