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Don't Blame UsSuburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party$
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Lily Geismer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157238

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157238.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 18 October 2019

Tightening the Belt

Tightening the Belt

Chapter:
(p.199) 8 Tightening the Belt
Source:
Don't Blame Us
Author(s):

Lily Geismer

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157238.003.0009

This chapter places the debates over voluntary integration within the context of the Boston busing crisis and the national recession. Explorations of the dramatic events that surrounded the Boston busing crisis have often focused on the ways in which “suburban liberals” passively stood by as working-class whites and blacks in the city endured the burden of school integration. However, the residents along Boston's Route 128 belt were not as removed from the events and issues as those depictions might suggest. The discussion about METCO during this period of turmoil illuminates how the various forces of suburban politics influenced the remedies to school desegregation and racial and economic inequality.

Keywords:   Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity, METCO, Boston busing crisis, national recession, school integration, suburban politics, racial inequality, economic inequality, voluntary integration, school desegregation

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