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Reflections on the Musical MindAn Evolutionary Perspective$
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Jay Schulkin

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157443

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157443.001.0001

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Music and Well-Being

Music and Well-Being

Chapter:
(p.172) Conclusion Music and Well-Being
Source:
Reflections on the Musical Mind
Author(s):

Jay Schulkin

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157443.003.0009

This conclusion considers the effects of music on well-being. Music evolved in the context of social contact and meaning. Music allows us to reach out to others and expand our human experience toward and with others. This process began with song and was expanded through instruments and dance. Music serves, among other things, to facilitate social cooperative and coordinated behaviors—the induction of “social harmonies.” Musical sensibility is a panoply of emotions that are inextricably linked to our cognitive, motor, and premotor resources and are expressed in everything we do, most especially in music. This conclusion also explains how music and language enhance each other with regard to cephalic function and behavioral adaptation, noting that both are essentially rooted in social contact.

Keywords:   music, well-being, social contact, meaning, song, dance, social harmonies, musical sensibility, emotions, language

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