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Rethinking Private AuthorityAgents and Entrepreneurs in Global Environmental Governance$
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Jessica F. Green

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157580

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157580.001.0001

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Governors of the Market: The Evolution of Entrepreneurial Authority

Governors of the Market: The Evolution of Entrepreneurial Authority

Chapter:
(p.78) Chapter Three Governors of the Market: The Evolution of Entrepreneurial Authority
Source:
Rethinking Private Authority
Author(s):

Jessica F. Green

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157580.003.0004

This chapter examines entrepreneurial authority from the 1950s to the present by focusing on the creation of environmental civil regulations. Private agents are most often useful for their expertise in technical matters and are delegated other tasks with little impact on state autonomy. However, they are rarely charged with potentially weightier tasks such as enforcement or rule making, and they are seldom the sole agents charged with a given task. Yet, if private actors are increasingly important in the landscape of global governance as many have claimed, the question is where and how they are projecting authority. The answer lies in the concept of entrepreneurial authority. The chapter shows that there has been a precipitous increase in the number of civil regulations since the 1950s. It also reveals that there is competition among various sources of entrepreneurial authority: different private actors are jockeying for market share in fairly narrow issue areas.

Keywords:   entrepreneurial authority, civil regulations, agents, private actors, governance, market share

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