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The Secular CitySecularization and Urbanization in Theological Perspective$
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Harvey Cox

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691158853

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691158853.001.0001

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The Shape of the Secular City

The Shape of the Secular City

Chapter:
(p.46) Chapter 2 The Shape of the Secular City
Source:
The Secular City
Author(s):

Harvey Cox

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691158853.003.0003

This chapter describes the shape of the secular city, illustrating two characteristic components of the social shape of the modern metropolis: anonymity and mobility. Not only are anonymity and mobility central. They are also the two features of the urban social system most frequently singled out for attack by both religious and nonreligious critics. The chapter demonstrates how both anonymity and mobility contribute to the sustenance of human life in the city rather than detracting from it, why they are indispensable modes of existence in the urban setting. It also shows why, from a theological perspective, anonymity and mobility may even produce a certain congruity with biblical faith that is never noticed by the religious rebukers of urbanization.

Keywords:   secular city, anonymity, mobility, urban social system, religious critics, city life, biblical faith, urbanization

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