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The Loneliness of the Black RepublicanPragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power$
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Leah Wright Rigueur

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691159010

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691159010.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 26 February 2020

Running with Hares and Hunting with Hounds

Running with Hares and Hunting with Hounds

Chapter:
Chapter One Running with Hares and Hunting with Hounds
Source:
The Loneliness of the Black Republican
Author(s):

Leah Wright Rigueur

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691159010.003.0002

This chapter discusses how the growing frustrations and shifting votes of African Americans were not representative of a larger ideological realignment. Over the next three decades, the black electorate would be substantially divided as African Americans were in no way a “monolithic Democratic voting bloc.” Despite Franklin Roosevelt's Black Cabinet, the Democratic Party during and immediately after the New Deal offered few bold civil rights initiatives. The programs and agencies of the New Deal were rife with discrimination; in this sense, the Republican and Democratic parties of this era did not display clear-cut differences in their civil rights policies. The result, then, was a surge in Democratic support among the black electorate but not the total liquidation of Republican backing.

Keywords:   African Americans, black electorate, Democratic voting bloc, Franklin Roosevelt, Black Cabinet, New Deal, civil rights, discrimination

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