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The Loneliness of the Black RepublicanPragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power$
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Leah Wright Rigueur

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691159010

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691159010.001.0001

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No Room at the Inn

No Room at the Inn

Chapter:
(p.302) Conclusion No Room at the Inn
Source:
The Loneliness of the Black Republican
Author(s):

Leah Wright Rigueur

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691159010.003.0009

This concluding chapter explores how the fundamental ideological rift illustrated by Elaine Jenkins' and Clarence Thomas' philosophies spoke to an evolution of the thoughts and actions that black Republicans had advanced since 1936. In that year, about one hundred African American party members from New York gathered to discuss the party's responsibilities in times of crisis; for them, Republicanism symbolized government that was “by the people,” that spoke to matters of social justice. And though they rejected the New Deal, disparaging social welfare as “handouts,” they nevertheless insisted that the party had to offer something to address racial inequality and the economic needs of the American public in a viable and empathetic way.

Keywords:   black Republicans, African Americans, Republicanism, Elaine Jenkins, Clarence Thomas, social justice, New Deal, racial inequality

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