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The Politics of Evangelical IdentityLocal Churches and Partisan Divides in the United States and Canada$
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Lydia Bean

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691161303

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691161303.001.0001

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Two Canadian Churches: Civil Religion in Exile

Two Canadian Churches: Civil Religion in Exile

Chapter:
(p.88) Chapter 4 Two Canadian Churches: Civil Religion in Exile
Source:
The Politics of Evangelical Identity
Author(s):

Lydia Bean

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691161303.003.0005

This chapter compares two American churches—Northtown Baptist and Lifeway Assembly of God—with two similar congregations just across the border in Canada: Highpoint Baptist and Grace Assembly of God. Both Canadian churches constructed their subcultural identity in ways that sounded similar to the two American churches. Like their American counterparts, Canadian evangelicals identified themselves as defenders of their nation's embattled Christian heritage and emphasized shared moral stances on abortion and sexuality. However, Canadian evangelicals used Christian nationalism in more broadly civic and nonpartisan ways: to draw strong subcultural boundaries, but also to express solidarity with Canadians across cultural, religious, and partisan divides. Because Canadian evangelicals drew on different narratives of Christian nationalism, they also talked differently about poverty and the welfare state in church contexts.

Keywords:   Northtown Baptist, Lifeway Assembly of God, Highpoint Baptist, Grace Assembly of God, subcultural identity, Canadian evangelicals, Christian nationalism

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