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Economic Interdependence and War$
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Dale C. Copeland

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691161587

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691161587.001.0001

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The Prelude to Pearl Harbor: Japanese Security and the Northern Question, 1905–40

The Prelude to Pearl Harbor: Japanese Security and the Northern Question, 1905–40

Chapter:
(p.144) Chapter Four The Prelude to Pearl Harbor: Japanese Security and the Northern Question, 1905–40
Source:
Economic Interdependence and War
Author(s):

Dale C. Copeland

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691161587.003.0005

This chapter demonstrates that Japan's foreign policy from 1931 to 1941 was rooted in a logic going back many decades. It starts by briefly discussing US–Japanese relations from the end of the Russo-Japanese War up to 1921. The chapter then turns to an exploration of Japanese behavior during the period of Shidehara diplomacy and late Taisho democracy. It shows that Japanese leaders of all stripes, including Foreign Minister Shidehara Kijuro, were hardheaded realists who sought to maintain Japan's economic position in Manchuria and northern China even as they acted to reduce the risk of economic or military conflict with the great powers. The rest of the chapter takes up a more detailed analysis of the tragic decade from 1931 to 1940.

Keywords:   World War II, Russo-Japanese War, US–Japanese relations, Japanese foreign policy, Shidehara Kijuro, Japanese economy, Taisho democracy, China, Manchuria

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