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Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative$

Alessandro Barchiesi

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691161815

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691161815.001.0001

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(p.185) Select Index

(p.185) Select Index

Source:
Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Achilles:
and Patroclus 40, 45–46, 56, 151 n 14;
compared to Turnus 117;
revenge of 4, 40, 62;
supplication of x, 48, 85–91, 144 n 47, 159 nn 25–26, 160 n 29;
see also supplex
Alexander the Great 30, 117
Alexandrian scholarship:
and Pergameme school 10, 33, 130;
response to Homer 17, 32–33, 70–72, 74–79, 126–128, 172 n 13
Apollonius of Rhodes 71, 99, 117, 170 n 4
authorial intention 124
Bacchylides 11, 138 n 18, 154 n 10, 163 n 1
baldric theme:
in Homer 18, 144 n 47, 145 n 49;
Cato (the Elder) 29
civil war 58, 60–66, 154 n 9
consolatio 13–14, 168 n 29
cultural models:
in Homer 3–4, 11, 49, 74, 77, 106, 128;
in Vergil 28, 31–33, 46–47, 51–53, 61–63, 65, 70, 145 n 56, 155 n 13, 157 n 15; see also hospitium, servare modum, supplex
epic formulae:
in Homer 2, 6, 14, 33, 49–50, 74–76, 81, 100, 159 n 24;
see also genre model
Epicureanism 111, 113, 168 n. 30
euchos 2, 20, 41
example model: xvi, 73–74, 122;
and epic typology 81–82;
and grammatical imitation 82;
and lexical imitation 82;
and Vergilian intertextuality 91–92
(p.186) fama 12–13, 21
fata:
inevitability of in Homer: 5–7, 9, 24, 27, 31–32, 8384,137 n 11;
genre model: xvi, 74, 122;
and epic typology 86, 105;
and formulaic expression 75–77, 79, 85–86, 122
gloria:
in Homer 25, 83;
in Vergil 12–13, 136 n 5, 140 n 30; see also fama
heroic death:
and the Patrokleia: 3, 15, 26;
conventions of in Homer 2, 5–6, 7–9, 14–15, 24, 38, 83, 85–87;
in Vergil: 4–6, 12–14, 16, 18–19, 41–43;
related to premature death: 11–12, 14, 40, 106, 139 n 25
heroic duel:
and androktasiai 38, 63;
conventions of in Homer15–18, 52, 142 n 41;
Homeric model:
Aeneid as a continuation of 4, 16, 20, 52, 56, 69–72, 112;
as a functional element in Vergil 3, 5, 15, 77;
Vergilian innovation on 6–18, 60–61, 161 n 31
hospitium 46–47
Juvenal 164 n 7
lament:
in tragedy 11–12, 107–108;
symbols of in Homer 8–9, 56, 104–106;
threnos 8, 105, 107, 165 n 18, 166 n 19
lion motif xi, 43, 80–82, 120, 156 nn 9–11
Livius Andronicus 142 n 41, 170 n 5
Meleager 11, 143 n 46
metaphor 13, 19, 60, 77, 143 n 47, 169 n 1
metonymy 20, 60, 63
monologue:
in Juturna’s speech 96–97, 101–104, 112–113;
in tragedy 107;
in verse 167 n 22
Moschus 98–99, 167 n 22
Naevius 71, 170 n 5
narrative disjunction 60–61, 92–93
narrative legibility viii–x, xv, 16, 35–36, 59
Odyssey:
of Vergil 117;
relation to Homer’s Iliad 71–72, 118, 169 n 2;
relation to Vergil’s Aeneid 26, 71, 118, 158 n 24, 160 n 27, 161 n 30, 170 n 6
parallelism:
between characters 40–41, 96;
narrative parallelism between texts 36–37, 42–43, 49–50, 56–57, 71, 81, 149 n 1, 150 n 11, 151 n 16, 152 n 4, 167 n 28
Philodemus x, 111, 113, 126, 163 n 6, 168 nn 29–30
Plautus 167 n 27
Plutarch 19, 140 n 33, 147 n 66, 148 n 70, 148 n 76, 154 n 9;
pseudo-Plutarch 138 n 20
(p.187) Polybius 30
polyphony viii, x–xi, 31, 60, 65, 69
Polystratos 12
prodigy in Homer 8, 33;
in Vergil 55–61, 64–67, 101, 103, 153 n 8
prolepsis:
“historic future” 28
rhesis 96, 100
Sallust 13, 29, 140 n 32
self-reflexivity 122–123
Seneca (the Younger) 30, 139 n 25
servare modum 25, 29–32
Sophocles 11, 19, 57, 107, 140 n 27, 163 n 1
Strabo 30
supplex 48, 84, 87, 157 nn 17–18, 158 n 24;
see also Achilles
Theocritus 11
tears:
of Hercules 6, 11, 139 n 25, 140 n 26;
of Juturna 85;
of Zeus 7–9, 33, 137 n 16
Tibullus 60, 64, 154 n 9
tragedy:
relation to epic viii, 27, 58, 105, 107–109,112, 120, 159 n 26, 167 n 26, 170 n 5