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Being German, Becoming MuslimRace, Religion, and Conversion in the New Europe$
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Esra Özyürek

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691162782

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691162782.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Germanizing Islam and Racializing Muslims

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Being German, Becoming Muslim
Author(s):

Esra Özyürek

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691162782.003.0001

This introductory chapter discusses some questions on the contradictions and challenges in the lives of German converts to Islam. It aims to provide a preliminary understanding of what it means to embrace Islam in a society that increasingly marginalizes and racializes Muslims. The chapter begins with a discussion of conversion to racialized religions, before considering whether Islamophobia is similar to anti-Semitism or homophobia. Afterward, the chapter narrows the context to Germany, revealing that even though Germany has a long history of racializing religion, especially Judaism, the racialization of Muslims with a clear class dimension is relatively new. This chapter also discusses the role of converts for a European Islam and Germany's long history of European conversions to Islam. Finally, the chapter lays out the methods and sources of research for this volume.

Keywords:   Germany, Islam, racialized religions, Islamophobia, European Islam, Germanizing Islam, racializing Muslims, religious conversion, religion

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