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Brazil in TransitionBeliefs, Leadership, and Institutional Change$
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Lee J. Alston, Marcus André Melo, Bernardo Mueller, and Carlos Pereira

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691162911

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691162911.001.0001

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A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Critical Transitions

A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Critical Transitions

Chapter:
(p.171) Chapter 7 A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Critical Transitions
Source:
Brazil in Transition
Author(s):

Lee J. Alston

Marcus André Melo

Bernardo Mueller

Carlos Pereira

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691162911.003.0007

This chapter fleshes out an inductive framework for understanding stasis and critical transitions. The framework has been developed with a lens on Brazil, but to illustrate its wider applicability, this chapter applies the framework very generally to understand the critical transitions in Argentina from the early twentieth century to 2014. The key elements in the framework are beliefs and leadership, which interact synergistically and vary across countries. Because beliefs and leadership cannot be measured rigorously and classified, the use of the framework necessarily involves subjectivity and interpretation. With more case studies applying this framework, more general lessons on the dynamics among beliefs, power, leadership, institutions, policies, and outcomes that form stasis or development can be constructed.

Keywords:   inductive framework, critical transitions, stasis, Argentina, beliefs, leadership

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