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Building an American EmpireThe Era of Territorial and Political Expansion$
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Paul Frymer

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691166056

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691166056.001.0001

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A Second Removal?

A Second Removal?

The Rise and Defeat of Black Colonization

Chapter:
(p.220) Chapter 6 A Second Removal?
Source:
Building an American Empire
Author(s):

Paul Frymer

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691166056.003.0006

This chapter examines the question of how the nation would eventually respond to the increasing numbers of free blacks as well as the impending end of legalized African slavery. It considers the popularity of black colonization and why this effort at a second removal of a large population was defeated. In particular, it looks at the two-year period in the first congressional session during the Lincoln administration, when the idea of black colonization seemingly had its greatest momentum yet suffered its most resounding defeat. The chapter first provides an overview of colonization schemes in the first two years of the Lincoln administration, Abraham Lincoln's foreign policy adventures, and his Emancipation Proclamation before discussing how the ambitions of American majorities for an all-white nation clashed with the realities of making such an event a reality in the context of a relatively weak American state.

Keywords:   free blacks, African slavery, black colonization, Abraham Lincoln, foreign policy, Emancipation Proclamation

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