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A Short History of German Philosophy$
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Vittorio Hösle

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691167190

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691167190.001.0001

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Only the Best Is Good Enough for God: Leibniz’s Synthesis of Scholasticism and the New Science

Only the Best Is Good Enough for God: Leibniz’s Synthesis of Scholasticism and the New Science

Chapter:
(p.39) 4 Only the Best Is Good Enough for God: Leibniz’s Synthesis of Scholasticism and the New Science
Source:
A Short History of German Philosophy
Author(s):

Vittorio Hösle

, Steven Rendall
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691167190.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716). Leibniz's oeuvre has incontestably gained prestige in the twentieth century. For thinkers who, like present-day analytical philosophers of religion, would like to articulate the basic ideas of classical metaphysics in a way that is logically more precise and not incompatible with modern science, Leibniz's ideas are the most important source of inspiration. His philosophical ideas stand much closer to traditional Christian theology and ethics, despite his fascination with modern science and despite his agreement with Spinoza that divine omnipotence implies omnicausality. He can also provide a good foundation for his intuitions because he is an incomparably better logician than Spinoza, indeed with the calculus ratiocinator he outlined the idea of a symbolic logic long before Boole, De Morgan, and Frege.

Keywords:   Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, German philosophy, German history, German philosophers, modern philosophy

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