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A Short History of German Philosophy$
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Vittorio Hösle

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691167190

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691167190.001.0001

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Why We Cannot Assume That There Will Continue to Be a German Philosophy

Why We Cannot Assume That There Will Continue to Be a German Philosophy

Chapter:
(p.263) 16 Why We Cannot Assume That There Will Continue to Be a German Philosophy
Source:
A Short History of German Philosophy
Author(s):

Vittorio Hösle

, Steven Rendall
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691167190.003.0016

This chapter argues that institutionally, there is little reason to predict a great future for German philosophy. The philosophical form of religiousness that so strongly distinguished Germany from the United States, has evaporated, presumably because sadness and shame over the twelve cursed years has crippled appropriation of the spiritual treasures of the past, which can take place only with hermeneutic reservations, for example on the occasion of the anniversaries of classics. Moreover, it is well known that German scientific institutions are not at present in the best of shape. The weaknesses of the German system have been amply discussed over the past two decades, but it is unlikely that fundamental reforms will be undertaken in the foreseeable future, because too many interests would be adversely affected.

Keywords:   German philosophy, German history, religiousness, scientific institutions

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