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A History of the 'AlawisFrom Medieval Aleppo to the Turkish Republic$
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Stefan Winter

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691167787

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691167787.001.0001

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Not Yet Nationals

Not Yet Nationals

Arabism, Kemalism, and the Alaouites (1888–1936)

Chapter:
(p.218) 6 Not Yet Nationals
Source:
A History of the 'Alawis
Author(s):

Stefan Winter

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691167787.003.0007

This chapter documents the ʻAlawis' ambivalent relationship with the Syrian Arab, Ottoman/Turkish, and French colonial projects at the threshold of the contemporary era. The first section considers the educational policies of the Abdülhamid regime toward the ʻAlawis, which generated what was probably the most extensive documentation ever in their regard. The second and third sections analyze ongoing control and development measures in the region under both Abdülhamid and the CUP government (1908–14), and show how the ʻAlawis capitalized on the opportunities provided by modern schooling and increasing contact with the outside world to promote a distinctly local, ʻAlawi “reformism.” The final section discusses the contrast between France's separatist, confessionalist policies and Turkey's resolve to incorporate and assimilate the ʻAlawis of Cilicia and the Alexandretta (Hatay) district.

Keywords:   ʻAlawis, colonialism, education policy, Abdülhamid regime, Turkey, France

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