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In the Shadow of World LiteratureSites of Reading in Colonial Egypt$
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Michael Allan

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691167824

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691167824.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Education

Education

The Moral Imperative of Modernization

Chapter:
(p.55) 3 Education
Source:
In the Shadow of World Literature
Author(s):

Michael Allan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691167824.003.0004

This chapter considers the pedagogical instantiation of literature as a disciplined practice, with particular emphasis on the arguments for reformed educational policy, often anchored in fears of fanaticism as a counterpart to the moral force of modernization. It discusses the role of education in the writings of colonial administrators Lord Cromer and Alfred Milner, both of whom associate learning to read with the cultivation of sensibilities necessary to the supposedly virtuous ends of liberal government. Drawing from distinctions between taʻlīm (instruction) and tarbiyah (cultivation), as well as opinions versus prejudice, the chapter examines the role of reading as part of a broader conceptualization of education, civic participation, and the colonial Egyptian state.

Keywords:   literature, education, Lord Cromer, Alfred Milner, taʻlīm, tarbiyah, reading, civic participation, colonial Egypt, modernization

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