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Becoming Black Political SubjectsMovements and Ethno-Racial Rights in Colombia and Brazil$
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Tianna S. Paschel

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691169385

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691169385.001.0001

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Political Field Alignments

Political Field Alignments

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Political Field Alignments
Source:
Becoming Black Political Subjects
Author(s):

Tianna S. Paschel

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691169385.003.0001

This chapter first sets out the book's purpose, which is to analyze the process through which blackness became legitimated as a category of political contestation in the eyes of the state and other powerful political actors in Latin America, specifically Colombia and Brazil. The author does this by examining archives and conducting ethnographic fieldwork over nearly eight years in the style of what scholars across disciplines have called “political ethnography.” The discussions then turn to a comparison of race relations in Latin America and the United States in the twentieth century; the adoption of specific policies for black populations in Latin America; ethno-racial policy in Latin America; and why Colombia and Brazil are obvious choices for an analysis of black rights in Latin America. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   blackness, political contestation, Colombia, Brazil, political ethnography, Latin America, black rights

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