Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
MoneyWhence It Came, Where It Went$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John Kenneth Galbraith

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691171661

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691171661.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Money

Money

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 Money
Source:
Money
Author(s):

John Kenneth Galbraith

James K. Galbraith

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691171661.003.0001

This book discusses the history of money. It considers what most shaped the development of money (as in the case of the Bank of England), the forces contending for control of money (as in the case of the struggle between Andrew Jackson and Nicholas Biddle), and what contributed most to our present understanding of money (as in the work of John Maynard Keynes and the recent history). This chapter considers changes in attitudes toward money, showing that they proceed in long cyclical swings. When money is bad, people want it to be better. When it is good, they think of other things. People who are experiencing inflation yearn for stable money and those who are accepting the discipline and the costs of stability come to accept the risks of inflation. This cycle teaches us that nothing, not even inflation, is permanent.

Keywords:   money, Bank of England, Andrew Jackson, Nicholas Biddle, John Maynard Keynes, inflation

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.