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City of RefugeSeparatists and Utopian Town Planning$
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Michael J. Lewis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691171814

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691171814.001.0001

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Christianopolis

Christianopolis

Chapter:
(p.57) 4 Christianopolis
Source:
City of Refuge
Author(s):

Michael J. Lewis

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691171814.003.0004

This chapter discusses the decision of Friedrich I, the Duke of Württemberg, to establish a town for religious refugees at the extreme northern edge of the Black Forest, in 1598. He hoped to attract the beleaguered Protestants of Austria, where the Counter-Reformation was in full vigor. Other European princes had done the same from time to time since the beginning of the Reformation, but Friedrich was the first to make the city itself a physical emblem of a Protestant sanctuary. The result was the first formally planned city of refuge, which he named Freudenstadt, which literally means “city of joy.” As designer of Freudenstadt, Duke Friedrich appointed Heinrich Schickhardt (1558–1635), one of the most prolific and amiable architects of the German Renaissance.

Keywords:   Friedrich I, Duke of Württemberg, religions refugees, Black Forest, town planning, Protestants, city of refuge, Freudenstadt, city of joy, Heinrich Schickhardt

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