Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
City of RefugeSeparatists and Utopian Town Planning$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael J. Lewis

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780691171814

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691171814.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 26 February 2020

Economy

Economy

Chapter:
(p.169) 7 Economy
Source:
City of Refuge
Author(s):

Michael J. Lewis

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691171814.003.0007

This chapter describes Robert Owen (1771–1858), a Welsh industrialist and social reformer, and Johann Georg Rapp's equal as a utopian visionary. In the summer of 1824, Rapp bought three thousand acres on the Ohio River, twenty-four miles downriver of Pittsburgh, and sent his advance party of builders ahead to erect the first houses. There they would be joined by the rest of the Harmonists in the summer of 1825. In the meantime, Rapp put New Harmony and its thirty thousand acres on the market, and only one buyer was ever seriously considered, Owen. Owen was one of the most complicated and ambitious personalities of the Industrial Revolution who saw no reason why the principles of running a rational and efficient cotton mill could not be applied to all of human society. He sought to create a visionary town, to which he gave the stirring and poignantly hopeful name Village of Unity and Mutual Co-operation.

Keywords:   Robert Owen, Johann Georg Rapp, town planning, Pennsylvania, Harmonists, Industrial Revolution

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.