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The Art of PhilosophyVisual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment$
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Susanna Berger

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691172279

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691172279.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 28 May 2020

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Art of Philosophy
Author(s):

Susanna Berger

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691172279.003.0006

This introductory chapter sets out the book's purpose, which is to introduce visual counterparts to the textual strategies of selection, encapsulation, and recombination employed by Aristotelian and anti-Aristotelian scholars and students in the early modern period. Many early modern philosophical images were the products of a particular moment in European history, when a method of transmitting knowledge aimed at optimizing efficiency through the clear presentation of information began to flourish. This study demonstrates that these images, rather than merely simplifying preexisting philosophical concepts, enrich theoretical knowledge by bringing it into visual form both in combination with words and independently of texts. The remainder of the chapter describes documents that are the subject of this study followed by an overview of the subsequent chapters.

Keywords:   philosophical knowledge, visualization, early modern period, philosophical images

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