Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Plural of UsPoetry and Community in Auden and Others$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bonnie Costello

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691172811

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691172811.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 01 July 2022

Poet and Audience

Poet and Audience

Chapter:
(p.122) 6 Poet and Audience
Source:
The Plural of Us
Author(s):

Bonnie Costello

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691172811.003.0006

Live performers often remark on the double nature of the audience relationship, intimate and collective. Such an intimate relationship is commonly associated with the experience of poetry. But poets can also create the opposite effect; more in line with the concert hall, they make us feel, even in the privacy of reading, that we are part of a large congregation or mass. What is the special social presence of poetic audience, and how is it different from or a model for other kinds of human community? What various relations does a poet establish or imagine with an audience when she says “we”? How is this related to the classic tension between poetry and rhetoric? This chapter argues that while we tend to think of poetry as intimate address, poets do conceptualize large assembled audiences and often draw on metaphors of performance to create a feeling of gathering, even as they retain the sense of intimate address.

Keywords:   poems, poetry, audience relationship, performers, poetic audience

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.