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Trading BarriersImmigration and the Remaking of Globalization$
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Margaret E. Peters

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691174488

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691174488.001.0001

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Immigration Policy in Small Countries: The Cases of Singapore and the Netherlands

Immigration Policy in Small Countries: The Cases of Singapore and the Netherlands

Chapter:
(p.162) Chapter 6 Immigration Policy in Small Countries: The Cases of Singapore and the Netherlands
Source:
Trading Barriers
Author(s):

Margaret E. Peters

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691174488.003.0006

This chapter examines whether increases in trade openness, firm mobility, and productivity lead to immigration restrictions, and not the other way around, by tracing the evolution of immigration policy in two small economies after World War II: Singapore and the Netherlands. In addition to addressing the reverse causality problem, the chapter considers how other states' actions affect the ability of Singaporean and Dutch firms to compete in the export markets. It shows that firms in Singapore and the Netherlands have been affected by changes that policymakers have had little control over, such as the rise of China and the entrance of Eastern European states into the European Union. These changes have led to decreasing support for open immigration.

Keywords:   trade openness, firm mobility, productivity, immigration restrictions, immigration policy, Singapore, Netherlands, firms, export markets, open immigration

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