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Trading BarriersImmigration and the Remaking of Globalization$
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Margaret E. Peters

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691174488

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691174488.001.0001

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The Rise of Anti-Immigration Sentiment and Undocumented Immigration as Explanations for Immigration Policy

The Rise of Anti-Immigration Sentiment and Undocumented Immigration as Explanations for Immigration Policy

Chapter:
(p.206) Chapter 7 The Rise of Anti-Immigration Sentiment and Undocumented Immigration as Explanations for Immigration Policy
Source:
Trading Barriers
Author(s):

Margaret E. Peters

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691174488.003.0007

This chapter examines whether anti-immigration sentiment and illegal immigration lead to immigration restrictions. It first considers the evidence for theories based on the macropolitical and macroeconomic conditions of the state, with emphasis on how democratization, growth, war, and state identities affect immigration policy. It then discusses four additional explanations for mass public support for immigration and/or other interest group activity on immigration: the role of workers, the effect of immigrants on the welfare state, nativism, and the impact of immigrants themselves. It also explores whether borders are increasingly restricted while enforcement lags in order to create an undocumented workforce that can easily be exploited. The findings support an interest-group-based argument for immigration policy, with firms as the most important interest group.

Keywords:   anti-immigration sentiment, illegal immigration, immigration restrictions, democratization, immigration policy, immigrants, welfare state, nativism, undocumented workforce, firms

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