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The Formative Years of RelativityThe History and Meaning of Einstein's Princeton Lectures$
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Jürgen Renn and Hanoch Gutfreund

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780691174631

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691174631.001.0001

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For the Second Edition

For the Second Edition

On The "Cosmologic Problem"

Chapter:
(p.269) Appendix For the Second Edition
Source:
The Formative Years of Relativity
Author(s):

Hanoch Gutfreund

Jürgen Renn

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691174631.003.0024

This chapter considers the so-called “cosmologic problem” in greater detail. According to Einstein, the problem can be roughly formulated as: on account of our observations on fixed stars we are sufficiently convinced that the system of fixed stars does not in the main resemble an island which floats in infinite empty space, and that there does not exist anything like a center of gravity of the total amount of existing matter. Rather, we feel urged toward the conviction that there exists an average density of matter in space which differs from zero. Hence, the chapter considers whether or not this hypothesis, which is suggested by experience, can be reconciled with the general theory of relativity.

Keywords:   cosmologic problem, fixed stars, gravity, general theory of relativity, space, matter

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