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Where Economics Went Wrong$
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David Colander and Craig Freedman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780691179209

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691179209.001.0001

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The Classical Liberal “Argumentation for the Sake of Heaven” Alternative

The Classical Liberal “Argumentation for the Sake of Heaven” Alternative

Chapter:
(p.120) 8 The Classical Liberal “Argumentation for the Sake of Heaven” Alternative
Source:
Where Economics Went Wrong
Author(s):

David Colander

Craig Freedman

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691179209.003.0008

This chapter examines the method of “argumentation for the sake of heaven.” This method entails an honest exploration by economists focused on advancing understanding, not on winning debates. Argumentation for the sake of heaven can only occur if one recognizes that it is needed. Thus, implementing an argumentation for the sake of heaven methodology would require economists ascribing to opposing views on policy to willingly personally discuss the nuances of their policy differences. The mutually held goal of these debaters arguing for the sake of heaven would be to reduce differences. To the degree possible, the overriding objective would be to reach a consensus, or at least a specification of what type of evidence might persuade economists on both sides of the policy issue, to change their mind.

Keywords:   argumentation, economists, policy differences, policy issue

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