Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Making It CountStatistics and Statecraft in the Early People’s Republic of China$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Arunabh Ghosh

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691179476

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691179476.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.281) 9 Conclusion
Source:
Making It Count
Author(s):

Arunabh Ghosh

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691179476.003.0009

This concluding chapter returns to the main themes of the book before ending with a brief overture to developments in 1979. In that year, the statistician Dai Shiguang published two influential articles calling for a complete overhaul of the system of socialist statistics. Dai Shiguang's articles had an electrifying impact in China's statistical world. Within a few years, socialist statistics was cast aside, much like an old cloak, and mathematical statistics was formally reintegrated into the discipline and practice of statistics. An entire way of knowing society came to an end. Facts that the state had both seen and cherished disappeared, along with the periodic reporting systems that supplied them. Other facts, which did not exist before the 1990s, grew to become central.

Keywords:   Dai Shiguang, socialist statistics, mathematical statistics, periodic reporting systems, Chinese statistics

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.