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The Making of the Ancient Greek EconomyInstitutions, Markets, and Growth in the City-States$
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Alain Bresson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780691183411

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691183411.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Nonagricultural Production, Capital, and Innovation

Nonagricultural Production, Capital, and Innovation

Chapter:
(p.175) VII Nonagricultural Production, Capital, and Innovation
Source:
The Making of the Ancient Greek Economy
Author(s):

Alain Bresson

, Steven Rendall
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691183411.003.0007

This chapter examines the logic of capital and innovation in nonagricultural production in Classical and Hellenistic Greece. It begins with a discussion of fish production and consumption in ancient Greece, focusing on salt production and the preservation of food supplies by means of salt and salting, before discussing the Greek cities' exploitation of their coastal waters. It then considers the importance of fish trade and fish consumption to food supply, artisanal trades, and the distinctive character of artisanal production. In particular, it analyzes the structures of production and the kinds of constraints, both in terms of technology and capital, involved in artisanal work. It also explains how enterprises were structured and how unskilled labor was used by looking at the case of textile manufacturing. Finally, it describes technological innovation in textile manufacturing and in the artisanal trades, including the introduction of rotary movement and the watermill.

Keywords:   nonagricultural production, capital, fish production, salt production, coastal waters, food supply, artisanal trades, textile manufacturing, technological innovation, watermill

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