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The Autocratic Middle ClassHow State Dependency Reduces the Demand for Democracy$
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Bryn Rosenfeld

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691192185

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691192185.001.0001

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State Dependency and Middle-Class Demand for Democracy

State Dependency and Middle-Class Demand for Democracy

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 State Dependency and Middle-Class Demand for Democracy
Source:
The Autocratic Middle Class
Author(s):

Bryn Rosenfeld

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691192185.003.0002

This chapter clarifies the variation in middle-class regime preferences and details the individual-level logic of state dependency. It discusses key concepts and descriptive data on the middle-classes and state economic engagement in the countries under study. It also captures the distinction between highly educated white-collar and professional strata versus less educated routine and manual laborers. The chapter provides a normative view of the middle-class as a carrier of democracy, as synonymous with the capital-owning bourgeoisie, and as an exclusively income-based category. It highlights the middle-class of educated professionals in modernization theory and its values-based variants, including the “middle sector” that emphasizes on members of a broad range of occupational groups between the working class and economic elite.

Keywords:   middle-class preferences, state dependency, white-collar, capital-owning bourgeoisie, modernization theory, middle sector

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