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Hacking DiversityThe Politics of Inclusion in Open Technology Cultures$
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Christina Dunbar-Hester

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780691192888

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691192888.001.0001

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Conclusion: Overcoming Diversity

Conclusion: Overcoming Diversity

Chapter:
(p.229) 8 Conclusion: Overcoming Diversity
Source:
Hacking Diversity
Author(s):

Christina Dunbar-Hester

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691192888.003.0008

This chapter assess the potentials and limitations of diversity advocacy in open-technology as a site for claiming equal rights, and as a quest for representation. It also evaluates the market logics that accompany advocacy. It reflects on the challenges inherent in centering a project that insists on a redress of imbalances of power around technology, arguing for a project of justice and equity that ironically decenters technology as a primary axis of intervention. The chapter argues that while voluntaristic tech communities cannot singlehandedly attain the scale of the endeavors they hope their interventions will address, they are well-positioned to offer care and analysis that can set a more expansive, yet more rigorous, agenda. It explores a variety of diversity advocates' interventions, which include changing rules and norms in open-technology communities, creating separate spaces for feminist hacking, bringing to the surface other political concerns like militarism and colonialism, and questioning the makeup of open-technology communities.

Keywords:   diversity advocacy, open-technology, market logic, intervention, feminist hacking, militarism, colonialism

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