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By Executive OrderBureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power$
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Andrew Rudalevige

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780691194363

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691194363.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 02 December 2021

Incorrigibly Plural

Incorrigibly Plural

Concluding Thoughts and Next Steps

Chapter:
(p.201) 8 Incorrigibly Plural
Source:
By Executive Order
Author(s):

Andrew Rudalevige

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691194363.003.0008

The concluding chapter summarizes the overall findings and pushes them toward related topics in sore need of additional study. It examines what happens before an executive order is issued, but we know little about what happens afterward. The conclusion is also a chance to explore the question of bureaucratic capacity and autonomy as it runs up against presidential desires to control that bureaucracy — a claim bolstered by electoral legitimacy. Presidential hostility to the permanent government is hardly new, of course. But the Trump administration's amplification of that contention — with frequent, personal attacks on agencies and even individual civil servants on the one hand, and “resistance” to presidential preferences on the other — raised its salience, and its stakes. The argument of this book rests in part on the value presidents derive — substantively but also politically — from astute management of a bureaucracy that can provide expert advice on solving pressing national problems. Undermining its ability to do so is therefore counterproductive.

Keywords:   executive order, bureaucratic capacity, bureaucratic autonomy, presidential hostility, presidential control

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