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Crossing the PomeriumThe Boundaries of Political, Religious, and Military Institutions from Caesar to Constantine$
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Michael Koortbojian

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691195032

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691195032.001.0001

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Constantine’s Arch and His Military Image at Rome

Constantine’s Arch and His Military Image at Rome

Chapter:
(p.123) 4 Constantine’s Arch and His Military Image at Rome
Source:
Crossing the Pomerium
Author(s):

Michael Koortbojian

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691195032.003.0005

This chapter analyzes the Arch of Constantine in Rome. First, it focuses on the roles of the SPQR and the emperor in the arch's design. In particular, the chapter deals with Constantine's role, or his conception of his role in the urbs, in the arch's imagery. Second, this chapter examines the meaning of the claim triumphis insignem—that is, that an arch, still customarily associated with triumph by the fourth century, was in this instance bestowed for a new purpose with a unique rationale, in a particular historical context, despite a lack of any persuasive evidence that an official triumph was actually celebrated. And finally, this chapter elucidates the arch's evocation of the emperor's role, both at home and abroad, as both civilis princeps and imperator exercitus.

Keywords:   Arch of Constantine, Roman monuments, triumphis insignem, emperor's role, civilis princeps, imperator exercitus, SPQR

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