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MisdemeanorlandCriminal Courts and Social Control in an Age of Broken Windows Policing$
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Issa Kohler-Hausmann

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780691196114

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691196114.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 27 January 2022

Managerial Justice

Managerial Justice

Chapter:
(p.60) 2 Managerial Justice
Source:
Misdemeanorland
Author(s):

Issa Kohler-Hausmann

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691196114.003.0003

This chapter starts by reviewing what we might expect to happen in response to a flood of cases. Given the received wisdom that lower criminal courts deliver “assembly-line justice,” it would be logical to assume that the increase of misdemeanor cases would result in lots of convictions and jail sentences. The chapter presents descriptive data that show what happened instead: a decline in the rate of criminal conviction and an increase in the rate of dismissal. The chapter proposes that a good way to make sense of the disposition trends of the past twenty-five years is to understand that misdemeanor justice in New York City has largely abandoned the adjudicative model of criminal law administration. Instead, it hews more closely to the “managerial model,” where the criminal process is deployed to figure out the rule-abiding propensities of people and to calibrate formal regulation accordingly.

Keywords:   managerial justice, managerial model, misdemeanor justice, misdemeanor cases, misdemeanor cases, disposition trends, criminal law administration

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